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Reviews


Fringereview

Testimony to their storytelling abilities – I can remember all that without looking. This is a great introduction to the story of a time of intrigue, battle and tragic consequences. As a story teller, John Nichol is an assured hand. Switching from each character with ease this is a polished and honed performance that clearly comes after many outings. Alongside Nichol, he is ably accompanied by Hilary Bell and Carly Bain onstage. There is a lot to get through and much to confuse but the battle over detail works well as we ride along and get the gist of it all.

The script was, for me, slightly leaden with a lot of it laid on thick but this was a minor gripe in amongst the amount of fun that was being had leading to the massacre. The accompanied music made the whole thing motor and the pace was judged well. There were a few missteps along the way which appeared carefully choreographed but we had a lot to get through in such a short space of time and if they weren’t they were handled well.

The pitch was clearly an adult one and apart from having it performed as a part of the celebrations of the battle as it was in 2013 and here at the Fringe it is hard to see where it would sit on tour. Certainly not a children’s piece and as for an adult piece I can hardly see many coming out on a Friday night to pay a tenner for it but the Fringe is encouraging to offers such as this and all the better for it.

It also helped having offstage voices and accompaniment as well as the four hands that appeared – 2 at either side of the stage – with white gloves. It was a nice addition to the theatricality of it all.

I enjoyed my history lesson and now want to know more. As a performance piece it is therefore hitting the right notes and making us sit up and ask questions. As an expose of the politics of the time it is a start and a pretty decent one at that.

Reviewer: Donald Stewart
Reviewed: 21st August 2016




★★★★

BroadwayWorld.com


Flodden is one of those bits of Scotland's past often referred to, for example in the folk song "The Flowers of the Forest", but not frequently taught. Hoping to be educated, I trooped along to Spotlites, where Soddin' Flodden presents the life of King James the 4th, from his youth right up to his death in one of the most important battles in Scottish history. John Nicol performs all of the characters of the story, with the help of frequent changing of representative hats, and just as quick accent changes. Occasionally, remembering all of the different characters can get a little confusing to someone new to the story, but Production Company IDEOMS are thoughtful enough to provide a programme with biographies of all the mentioned characters. There is plenty of broad comedy throughout the performance, aided by some hardworking stage crew, and a little audience participation for those who sit in the front row. Nicol is accompanied by a guitarist and fiddler, whose knowing looks and arched eyebrows in response to the story were the cause of much further amusement. Delightful song parodies from, Herman's Hermits to Cabaret via the Village People peppered the performance, and were certainly a memorable way to remember the events portrayed. Indeed, it's fair to say that history was never this much fun in school, nor did teachers give out free cake like at this performance! The overall effect is witty, warm and charming and a far better way to get to grips with Scottish history than traipsing around tourist sites in the rain.

Reviewer: Amy Hanson
Reviewed: 16th August 2016
★★★★




Fringereview

Testimony to their storytelling abilities – I can remember all that without looking. This is a great introduction to the story of a time of intrigue, battle and tragic consequences. As a story teller, John Nichol is an assured hand. Switching from each character with ease this is a polished and honed performance that clearly comes after many outings. Alongside Nichol, he is ably accompanied by Hilary Bell and Carly Bain onstage. There is a lot to get through and much to confuse but the battle over detail works well as we ride along and get the gist of it all.

The script was, for me, slightly leaden with a lot of it laid on thick but this was a minor gripe in amongst the amount of fun that was being had leading to the massacre. The accompanied music made the whole thing motor and the pace was judged well. There were a few missteps along the way which appeared carefully choreographed but we had a lot to get through in such a short space of time and if they weren’t they were handled well.

The pitch was clearly an adult one and apart from having it performed as a part of the celebrations of the battle as it was in 2013 and here at the Fringe it is hard to see where it would sit on tour. Certainly not a children’s piece and as for an adult piece I can hardly see many coming out on a Friday night to pay a tenner for it but the Fringe is encouraging to offers such as this and all the better for it.

It also helped having offstage voices and accompaniment as well as the four hands that appeared – 2 at either side of the stage – with white gloves. It was a nice addition to the theatricality of it all.

I enjoyed my history lesson and now want to know more. As a performance piece it is therefore hitting the right notes and making us sit up and ask questions. As an expose of the politics of the time it is a start and a pretty decent one at that.

Reviewer: Donald Stewart
Reviewed: 21st August 2016






Ideoms

Soddin’ Flodden

Soddin’ Flodden @spotlites @edfringe

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Sun 14th - Sun 28th August 2016

7:30pm (55 mins)

From Scotland

1513, Flodden Field: among the dead lay Scotland's most popular Stewart King and the flower of her nobility.

Who was James IV, the charismatic monarch with a passion for women, alchemy, cannons and metal underwear?

Were his 'three steps into England' just a mad-cap, ill-considered, naive adventure, destined to end in disaster?

Or was he driven to it by the French, and having suffered relentless provocation by the arrogant Henry VIII?

With creative and quirky storytelling interwoven with a witty selection of songs, Ideoms will attempt to dispel the resulting 500-year-old inferiority complex.

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Tickets:
£10 (£7 Concession) (£24 family of 4)

Group discount: 10% off for groups of 10+


Friends of Fringe: 2 for 1 anytime – only available from Fringe Box Office

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